Category AAA Meetings

APLA Graduate Student Paper Prize Competition

 
The APLA Board invites individuals who are students in a graduate degree-granting program (including M.A., Ph.D. and J.D.) to send stand-alone papers centering on the analysis of political and legal institutions and processes. Topics may include citizenship; colonialism and post-colonial public spheres; cosmopolitanism; cultural politics; disability; environment; globalization; governance; humanitarianism; medicine, science, and technology; multiculturalism; nationalism; NGOs and civil society; new media; immigration and refugees; resistance; religious institutions; sovereignty; war and conflict.  We encourage submissions that expand the purview of political and legal anthropology and challenge us to think anthropologically in new ways about power, politics and law.
APLA awards a cash prize of $350.00, plus travel expenses of up to $650.00 if the prize winner attends the 2014 annual meetings of the American Anthropological Association (Washington, DC) to receive the prize in person. The prize winner will be announced in Anthropology News, and the winning paper will be published in the peer-reviewed journal of the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology, PoLAR: The Political and Legal Anthropology Review.
This year, learning from other sections, the process will be a little different. The committee will select five finalists. Each finalist will be assigned a mentor who has shared substantive interests, and who will offer feedback. APLA will sponsor a session at the AAA meetings in Washington with the finalists and their mentors.
Authors must be enrolled in a graduate program through at least May 1, 2015. Papers should not exceed 8,000 words (including notes and references) and should follow the style guidelines of PoLAR, which are detailed in the American Anthropological Association Style Guide.
Please submit papers as PDF attachments.
Submissions and questions should be sent to Mark Schuller – mschuller@niu.edu

Deadline: August 1, 2014

Presidential Address Now Published!

spring conference 2013

Don’t miss Susan Coutin and Sally Merry’s joint APLA-AES 2013 Presidential Address now published in American Ethnologist:

Technologies of truth in the anthropology of conflict

Abstract

Science and technology studies can help to unveil invisible modes of power that are embedded in the ways conflicts are known, debated, and resolved. Legal forms of adjudication, reporting systems used by international commissions, and data gathering on the part of governmental and nongovernmental agencies shape how conflicts are fought out on the ground and in policy arenas. Assumptions about evidence, categorization, adjudication, and measurement privilege certain forms of suffering over others, even as they omit phenomena that defy categorization. Using two examples—a global survey of violence against women and a U.S. government initiative to defer the deportation of certain undocumented immigrants—we bring insights from science and technology studies to bear on sociolegal phenomena. In so doing, we highlight tensions between measurement and invention, visibility and invisibility, and objectivity and discretion that are intrinsic to new forms of governance. We thus examine what measurement initiates and precludes, the reactive and proactive nature of technologies, and how new practices reproduce established techniques.